Vision and Priorities for Gilpin County

My priorities are shaped by listening to residents, attending community group meetings and participating in work groups in Gilpin County pursuing solutions to identified community needs. They are diverse. I grew up learning the importance of public service from a military father and healthcare industry mother who taught us to give to others and decades later volunteerism is still an integral part of who I am. My family is of mixed political leanings and I believe every vote counts and every voter has a chance to influence change by voting. Having twenty five years of government experience, I know what it takes to find solutions, navigate systems, and get things done. I value others' views and am an attentive listener, a strong collaborator, and able to see the big picture. I would be honored to blend my work, mountain life and volunteer experiences into being a County Commissioner working hard for you.
Priority Issues and Focus Areas
  • Financial and community recovery after Coronavirus, diversifying revenue streams for the County, then sustainability of County funds, services, infrastructure and equipment
  • Emergency preparedness, egress, and safe forest use for all corners of the county
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  • Encouraging small business including eateries, recreation and homecare services
  • Partnering with agencies and businesses to expand access to health care, care for all ages, and create affordable senior housing.
  • Implementing County Strategic Plan which includes a focus on staff retention, voice, and appreciation; Incorporating Comprehensive Plan outcomes into decisions 
  • Historic preservation of both cultural history and buildings, creating educational materials for residents and tourism to showcase Gilpin County's rich history
  • Quiet Skies and FAA Metroplex involvement and action to preserve our county's serenity, wildlife and historic areas in the face of changed transportation routes
Protecting our Natural Resources
Residents of Gilpin County want the rural feel and public mountainous lands preserved in the face of growth. Safe forest use and access, plus low fire risk are vital for us all. We live with a mix of residential, commercial and recreational users who need to be stewards of our forests, land and waters. Keeping in mind the pressures on our land and water are key to thoughtful planning decisions. Climate change action is urgent and mitigation of historic mines is important. The County has a wildfire protection plan and risk assessment areas to use in prioritizing mitigation decisions. Grants may help residents with their fire prevention efforts. Public input and information to residents benefits us all. Looking at what neighboring counties and cities nationwide are doing may generate new ideas on how to balance the needs of our varied land users while being watchful of or natural resources. This includes supporting nearby TEG in Coal Creek. Creating forest volunteer programs could support  Forest Service and our local law enforcement in monitoring forest lands. S
Human Services Collaborations
With the county plan to consolidate human services, public health, veterans services, mental health, food bank and resources information into a new location, my extensive background in Human Services direct services and management will help promote this transition for the community. It will be vital to inform the public of this "one stop shopping" location and its benefits, plus to continue post-Coronavirus assistance to our most vulnerable residents. With the relocation, there will be opportunities to more easily cross refer, easing the processes for Gilpin residents. Coordination on funding and potential grants along the Peak to Peak area may emerge. Past programs for children and healthcare can be revisited. With the county aging, added focus on services and housing for our older relatives, caregivers and ourselves will be necessary future planning. This could lead to more local small businesses, an integral part of Gilpin County's recovering workforce. Opening the new location frees up space for the Sheriff's Office to expand to meet its space needs without building a new jail.